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A list of about 90 books I liked most, but not necessarily in this order. My astrology books are not included.
Environs 90 Livres que j'aimais beaucoup, pas necessairement dans l'ordre ci-dessous. Mes livres d'Astrologie non-inclus
De ongeveer 90 boeken die ik goed en belangrijk vond, in willekeurige volgorde. Mijn astrologie boeken heb ik niet opgenomen.


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BOOKS * BOEKEN * BOOKS * BOEKEN * BOOKS



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Before I start my list of favorites, here are some books I read the past years and which I think are important if one wants to know more about developments in present day society:

We worden steeds slimmer by Clive Thompson. Als je als oudere (laten we zeggen boven de 40) niet precies weet wat het nut is van Twitter, Facebook, etc en hoe die gezamelijk denken bevorderen en tegelijkertijd tijd sparen, hoe leermethoden op scholen verbeterd kunnen worden, kortom hoe nuttig internet en sociale media kunnen zijn, lees dit boek!

Haruki Murakami - all his books. Deze Japanse schrijver heeft een fantastisch taalgebruik, een enorme fantasie. Ergens is zijn stijl iets tussen hardop denken, meedelen, met de lezer praten in. Hoe hij dat precies doet - je kan er niet de vinger op leggen, maar effectief is het wel, je moet wel meedoen met zijn spel, meegaan met zijn belevenissen.

De Wetten (the Laws) by Connie Palmen. She has not been included in the "big three" of modern Dutch writers, possibly because she is a woman, but her writing is excellent and enriched by her philosophic education. In a fascinating way she melts together with her characters and so airs her opinions which give pause for thought. Other books Lucifer and I.M., etc

De lessen van burn-out (The lessons of burn-out) by Annegreet van Bergen. Burn-out is far more common than in the past. Is it because people work harder or because they are busier taking holidays or is it the strains of 2 parents both working and having problems how to take good care of their children, or keeping their rlationship in order? Anyway, this book gives a very good idea what burn-out is, so if your partner or anyone else has a burnout, you can better undersand and help them.

Italiaanse schoenen (Italian shoes) by Henning Mankell. While Mankell is mostly known for his detective stories, here he writes about a retired chirurgeon, who has refused his whole life to connect with people and with himself. He lives alone on a Swedish island when he is visited by his old love, now an old dying woman, who disrupts his life.

Het zijn net mensen (They look like people) by Joris Luyendijk. Baanbrekend beeld van de nieuwsvergaring en de manipulatie van het nieuws, al dan niet opzettelijk, door tv en radio correspondenten in het Midden Oosten (maar niet alleen daar). En over de rol die de al dan niet geoliede propaganda machines daarin spelen. Fascinasting but scary picture of gathering or manipulation of the news, not necessary on purpose, by radio and tv correspondents in the Middle East. And about the influence of well-oiled propaganda machines.

Das Methusalem komplott (The Methusalem Complot) by Frank Schirrmacher. A book about the growing number of older (and by far not always healthy) people in society and what that involves.

Tijd van onbehagen (time of discomfort)filosofische essays over een cultuur op drift by Ad Verbrugge. A European writes about values and developments in modern Society.

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Favourites

Omar Khayyam: The Rubaiyat. These unique quartrains give us so much wisdom about life and how to live it, about religions, wine and love, about death and about living in the present, all very poetic and with humor. For me the best of world literature. Many translations exist from the Persian original. Every one should read the Rubaiyat. You will find an introduction and my new English and Dutch translations on this website.

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Franz Toussaint: traduction en Francais de Rubaiyat d'Omar Khayyam. This I consider the best translation of the famous quatrains by Omar Khayyam. If I could take only one book to the proverbial uninhabited island, this would be it.

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Dr Seuss: The Cat with the Hat and all his other children books. He has set his task to use only a very limited number of words and what he does with them is amazing. And the drawings are great, for young and old.

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The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Power to the East by Kishore Mahbubami. A "must" for all politicians, (business)leaders and people interested in politics and a changing society. He gives us more wise lessons than can be mentioned here.

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Lewis Carroll: Alice in Wonderland. The magnificent children story that makes fine reading for people of all ages.

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Michael Ende: The never-ending story. A tale of a great symbolic adventure for the young and young of spirit.

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A.A.Milne: Winnie the Pooh. Who does not know this friendly bear and Robin and the other animals such as Eeyore?

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Brothers Grimm: Mother Goose Fairytales (Moeder de Gans). A classic. Fairy tales are so important for children as they grow up.

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Bruno Bettelheim: The uses of enchantment (Psychoanalyse des Contes de Fees). A very fine study on fairy tales and their importance.

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Leonard Huizinga: Hieronymus. The illustrated story of the Holy Hieronymus and a lion with a thorn in its paw.

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Selma Lagerlof: Niels Holgersson's wonderful adventures. A boy travels to the North of Scandinavia on the back of a goose.

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Josephine Siebe: Harlekijntje op kasteel Hemelhoog. The Harlequin books are a special favourite of mine. A great heart and a spirit that also likes to play jokes on people, especially the Duke.

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Hans Andersen: Fairytales (sprookjes). The modern "brothers Grim".

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L.Frank: The land of Oz. Those that don't know the book may know the movie or the musical.

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Joe Hyams: Zen in the Martial Arts. Stories about different forms of the martial arts and their spiritual lessons.

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Blyth: Haiku (4dln) and Zen in English literature and Oriental Classics.These are the very best books in English about the fine art of Japanese haiku, the short poems that express everything in 17 sylabels.

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Basho: Haiku's and Journal. Basho was not only the best known Haiku poet but also a great writer.

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Robert Louis Stevenson: Le diable dans la bouteille (The devil in the bottle), Fables, etc. Robert Louis Stevenson not only wrote fantastic adventure stories; he also wrote a number of very fine fables and parables.

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Paissy (or Russian anonymous): The way of a pilgrims. Amazing story of a simple Russian seeking enlightenment.

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Werumeus Buning: Maria Lecina. This is a rather long poem about the mysterious Maria Pepita Lecina. Many are the adaptions as the rhythm is so catching.

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Alexandre Dumas: Comte de Monte Christo. (Duke of Monte Christo.) This story of the young seaman wrongly sentenced to life in jail on an island near Marseilles, and who, after a miraculous escape comes into possession of a great treasure and uses that for vengeance on those that were responsible for his conviction, is of all ages.

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Theo Thijssen: Kees de Jongen. The day-dreams of a young boy that must be recognisable to all of us that were boys.

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Robert A Johnson: He; She; Extase. Wonderful little books full of wisdom.

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Richard Bach: Illusions, etc. The spiritual story of a man that makes his living offering people at country fairs all over America flights in his little plane, and who meats a mystical pilot.

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Tolstoy: War and peace; Fairytales. Tolstoy's War and Peace is a very long story about a Russian war and the farmer type general avoiding direct engagement and winning in the end. In spite of its length it never bores. His Fairytales are short and to the point.

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Dickens: The Pickwick papers. Great characters, great humor in an England not too long ago.

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Oscar Wilde: Reading Goal (jail); Dorian Gray. Unfortunately, for some Oscar Wilde is better known for his personal life than for his books. Reading Goal is a marvelous poem about a jail. Dorian Gray the story of a young man trying to stay young as long as possible, but failing in the end. Very up to date in these times of people getting much older than before.

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E. du Perron: In deze grootse tijd.(in this great time The forerunner of the present-day weblogs by a writer that killed himself when Holland was invaded in 1940.

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Steven Spender: Engaged in writing. Comments and memories on living by an English writer of the Auden/Isherwood generation.

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Sherwood Anderson: Stories. Great short stories of this born story teller.

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Arnold Toynbee: A study of history, etc. I consider Arnold Toynbee the greatest historian of our time. Here he writes about civilizations.

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Andre Gide: Journals, etc. A French writer still worth reading.

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Stefan Zweig: Die Schachkampf.he chess match). Marvelous story by this well-known writer about some-one possessed by chess.

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Hemingway: The sun also rises. Mentioning this book does not mean that I don't like his A movable feast and other books.

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George Orwell: 1984. This prophetic book about the world as he imagined it long ago has come true in quite some respects.

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Jack London: various. Jack London's stories are still fun to read.

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Marcel Proust: A cote de chez Swan. Memories; if we also could write our memories like this!

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A. Roland Holst: Een winter aan zee. (A winter at sea). You can smell the sea!

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O'Henry: stories. An old writer, but the stories are still good.

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Edgar Allen Poe: Stories. The first to write detectives and thrillers. And still amongst the best!

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Elschot: Lijmen - Het been. Raw realism and feeling; well worth reading.

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Melville: Moby Dick. One of the grandest quests; the Captain Ahab and the whale. This book starts with one of the most famous sentences.

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Kafka: The process. What can we say - being of the generation that experienced the cold war, how do people that experience present American prisons react?

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Carlo Collodi: Pinokkio. This off course is a children story but fun for all. Pinokkio's nose grew each time he lied; a pity the same does not happen to our politicians.

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Cervantes: Don Quichot. Hopefully there will always be Don Quichots that dare fight against windmills.

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Swift: Gulliver's journeys.Another classical tale of traveling unknown territory.

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Plato: Discourses. Plato was - and is - a wise man and should still be read.

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Harrie Mulisch: De aanslag (The attack). A haunting story about the occupation of the Netherlands, just as things happened.

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Wisdom of the East. The mysterious East has a lot to offer to our capitalistic and scientific approach to life.

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Anais Nin: Journaux (Journals). The confessions of a woman living in the suburbs of Paris. For her erotic past one has to read her secret journals.

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Alice Miller: Het begaafde kind (The brilliant child). Every one that wants to understand children should read this.

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C Buddingh: Poems (Gedichten). A very original, very funny Dutch poet.

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Andre Brink: Rumors of Rain. About South Africa during the Apartheid.

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Hoornik: Verhalend proza; gedichten(stories; poems). One of the best Dutch poets.

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Henry Miller: Quiet days in Clichy; Tropic of Capricorn. Quiet days in Clichy shows us the world of an American writer and journalist in Paris.

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Steinbeck: Tortilla Flat. The picture of a lovely wine drinking village.

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Multatuli: Ideas(IdeeŽn); Max Havelaar. The greatest Dutch writer, who lived in Indonesia for a while and wrote about society in general as well as about the Dutch colonial times.

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James Joyce: The writer as a young man. For all creative young men.

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Jean Guitton: Mon testament philosophique. A French philosopher and his reflections at the end of his life

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Romain Gary: Au-dela de cette limite votre ticket n'est plus valable (past this gate your ticket is no more valid). At a certain age one is shut out of a number of things, one is slowly pushed out. Gary writes penetrative about that experience

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Paul Gallico: The seven dolls. A very moving story about a puppet manipulator and his female assistant.

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Thor Heyerdahl: Expedition of the Kon-tiki. The story of a great expedition on a raft, to prove that people could have crossed the Ocean this way long ago.

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Master Eckhart: sayings.

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Vladimir Majakovski: Een wolk in broek. (a cloud in pants). One of Russia's great poets.

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Yevgeny Yevtushyenko: A precocious Autobiography. His style is his own, but in the class of Joyce.

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Ouspenski: The fourth way. Ouspenski, a pupil of Gurdieff, gives us a lot of ideas about self development.

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Krisnamurti: Commentaries on living I en II. Commentaries one can read and reread; wisdom in very poetic settings.

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Dostojewski: The idiot; Crime and Punishment (De idioot, Schuld en Boete); other works. Deep psychological portraits of the human race. One feels one with the characters, when they stumble, murder, love.

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Maarten Toonder: Vroeger was de aarde plat, Ollie B.Bommel. The cartoons are well illustrated and the stories original and full of hints (and laughs) at society. His autobiography is written with the same flair and original, concocted words

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Benoite Groult: Zout op m'n huid (Solt on my skin). A very sensual love story.

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Antoine de Saint-Exupery: The little prince (De kleine Prins). About a little person that travells from planet to planet.

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Charles M. Schulz: All Charlie Brown/Peanuts books. Who does not know Charlie Brown, his sister and his friends?

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Neruda: Poems (Gedichten); I admit I have lived.(Ik beken ik heb geleefd, autobiographie.) Poems and autobiography of the great South American poet.

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Louis Paul Boon: My small war, etc. (Mijn kleine oorlog, etc). Boon's journalistic work and journal about the war to my mind are even better than his novels.

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C.B.Charles: From the little cold front (Van het kleine koude front).Another sublime remembrance of the war and the people that experience it.

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Dylan Thomas: Adventures in the Skin Trade.Pity Dylan Thomas has not written more.

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Mark Twain: Tom Sayers. The adventures at home and along the Mississippi of one white and one black boy.

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Tanizaki: La confession impudique. A highly sexual fantasy that is not all that uncommon.

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Bomans: Erik of het kleine Insectenboek. Bomans, who also wrote fairy tales and a number of short witty stories, here tells us about Erik's adventures in the animal world.

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Lawrence Durrell: The Alexandria Quartet.

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D.H.Lawrence: Sons and daughters, etc.

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Jules Verne: all his books. Many of the things we find quite normal today were seen already by Jules Verne long ago, such as his submarine, balloons.

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Milan Kundera: La Plaisanterie.Not very exciting but very pleasant reading.

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Agatha Christy: all. The unsurpassed master of crime stories with the famous Mrs Marple solving crimes while knitting or her famous male counterpart Poirot using the little grey cells.

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Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes. The eccentric crime solver, playing his violin when not in action.

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