History illustrated   Page 1(2)



The American manned space program 1958 - 1979

Mercury Redstone-1 launch vehicle at Launch Pad 5.
November 21, 1960
Alan Shepard undergoes a flight simulation test.
April 29, 1961
"Freedom 7" (MR-3) lifts off carrying Alan Shepard in the first U.S. manned space flight.
May 5, 1961
credit to NASA.    Scanning credit to Kipp Teague


Redstone - Mercury

[Description of history is to be added]

John Glenn poses in front of his capsule during pre-launch procedures at Launch Complex 14.
February 13, 1962
Closeup of MA-9 Mercury capsule atop Atlas booster.
May 14, 1963
Liftoff of Mercury Atlas 7 from Complex 14 carrying astronaut Scott Carpenter and the Aurora 7 for the second manned orbital mission.
May 24, 1962
credit to NASA.    Scanning credit to Kipp Teague



Atlas - Mercury

[Description of history is to be added]

Gemini 7 as seen from Gemini 6 during their rendezvous in space.
December 15, 1965
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague





Ed White during first U.S. space walk.
Gemini 4; June 9, 1965
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague





Facilities Test Saturn V SA-500F is visible on pad 39A during the Gemini 11 liftoff. September 12, 1966
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague




Titan II - Gemini

[Description of history is to be added]

Technicians in the Firing Room listen to Apollo 12 and Mission Control overcome lightning-induced electrical problems.
Kennedy Space Center, Florida, November 14, 1969
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague





Wide angle view of Mission Control Center during Apollo 14 transmission.
Houston, Texas, January 31, 1971
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague





Wide angle view of Mission Control Center just after lift-off of Apollo 15.
The plots on the screen are meant to enable the flight controllers to ascertain that the Saturn V stays within its flight envelope. Altitude, downrange distance, inertial flight path angle and velocity are the most important parameters for the assessment. The 2nd and the 3rd plot screens from right to left, are also meant to oversee the several abort mode regions in a flight path angle versus velocity plot. An abort will result in a landing into the Atlantic Ocean of the Command Module or a contingency orbit for the Command & Service Module.
Houston, Texas, July 26, 1971
credit to NASA




The Apollo era

[Description of history is to be added]

Apollo 8 on pad 39-A at twilight. December 17, 1968
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague





Liftoff of Apollo 16; April 16, 1972
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague




Title

[Description of history is to be added]

LM ascent stage "Eagle" returns from the moon's surface. "Eagle" is about to dock with the CSM "Columbia". Apollo 11, July 21, 1969
credit to NASA
Scanning credit to Kipp Teague

Title

[Description of history is to be added]


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Copyright 2005 by Sander Panhuyzen
Comments and questions are welcome. All pictures and drawings contained on and through these pages are the author's, unless otherwise noted. No unauthorized reproduction without permission.